Primary productivity and mass fluxes for four stations in teh equatorial Pacific (Table 1)

DOI

Primary productivity (14C) and mass flux measurements using a free-drifting sediment trap deployed at 900 m were made at four stations in the Pacific Ocean between 12°N and 6°S at 153°W. The latitudinal variations in productivity were consistent with historical patterns showing the equator as a zone of high production and the oligotrophic waters north of the equatorial region as an area of low productivity. The correlation coefficient between the two sets of independent measurements was 0.999, indicating that in this oceanic area the activity of the primary producers was closely related to the total mass flux. A re-examination of historical data suggests that the downward flux of particulate organic carbon varies in direct proportion to the quotient of surface primary production raised to the 1.4 power and depth raised to the 0.63 power.

measured during January 1982

Supplement to: Betzer, Peter R; Showers, William J; Laws, Edward A; Winn, Christopher D; DiTullio, Giacomo R; Kroopnick, Peter M (1984): Primary productivity and particle fluxes on a transect of the equator at 153°W in the Pacific Ocean. Deep-Sea Research Part A. Oceanographic Research Papers, 31(1), 1-11

Identifier
DOI https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.89398
Related Identifier https://doi.org/10.1016/0198-0149(84)90068-2
Metadata Access https://ws.pangaea.de/oai/provider?verb=GetRecord&metadataPrefix=datacite4&identifier=oai:pangaea.de:doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.89398
Provenance
Creator Betzer, Peter R; Showers, William J; Laws, Edward A ORCID logo; Winn, Christopher D; DiTullio, Giacomo R; Kroopnick, Peter M
Publisher PANGAEA
Publication Year 1984
Rights Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported; https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
OpenAccess true
Representation
Language English
Resource Type Supplementary Dataset; Dataset
Format text/tab-separated-values
Size 8 data points
Discipline Earth System Research
Spatial Coverage (-153.000W, -6.000S, -153.000E, 12.000N)