Does the unemployment benefit institution affect the productivity of workers? Evidence from a field experiment 2010-2015

DOI

Dataset is comprised of experimental outcomes and observational data. The project investigates whether and how the type of unemployment benefit institution affects productivity. We designed a field experiment to compare workers’ productivity under a welfare system, where the unemployed receive an unconditional monetary transfer, with their productivity under a workfare system, where the transfer is received conditional on the unemployed spending some time on ancillary activities. Over 300 subjects signed up for the experiment and were employed as research assistants to code newspapers. They remained employed based on their subsequent productivity.

Experimental design. For the four groups (two UBIs - unconditional and conditional, and two No UBI - comparison) we recruited students from University of Rosario and University of Los Andes, to work as research assistants. Among all subjects available, we randomly selected and invited to the induction day approximately 100 subjects per treatment/stage. Coders’ daily productivity was measured by the number of news correctly coded per day.

Identifier
DOI https://doi.org/10.5255/UKDA-SN-854217
Metadata Access https://datacatalogue.cessda.eu/oai-pmh/v0/oai?verb=GetRecord&metadataPrefix=oai_ddi25&identifier=94d60ccb6f947c1953f007e8e144c8b9bd64c4f8090df186d241baa1c5b33dd1
Provenance
Creator Blanco, M, Universidad Del Rosario; Dalton, P, Tilburg University; Vargas, J, Universidad Del Rosario
Publisher UK Data Service
Publication Year 2020
Funding Reference Economic and Social Research Council
Rights Mariana Blanco, Universidad Del Rosario. Patricio Dalton, Tilburg University. Juan Vargas, Universidad Del Rosario; The Data Collection is available to any user without the requirement for registration for download/access.
OpenAccess true
Representation
Resource Type Numeric; Text
Discipline Economics; Social and Behavioural Sciences
Spatial Coverage Colombia