Seawater carbonate chemistry and diatom silica production in the Southern Ocean

DOI

Diatoms, large bloom-forming marine microorganisms, build frustules out of silicate, which ballasts the cells and aids their export to the deep ocean. This unique physiology forges an important link between the marine silicon and carbon cycles. However, the effect of ocean acidification on the silicification of diatoms is unclear. Here we show that diatom silicification strongly diminishes with increased acidity in a natural Antarctic community. Analyses of single cells from within the community reveal that the effect of reduced pH on silicification differs among taxa, with several species having significantly reduced silica incorporation at CO2 levels equivalent to those projected for 2100. These findings suggest that, before the end of this century, ocean acidification may influence the carbon and silicon cycle by both altering the composition of the diatom assemblages and reducing cell ballasting, which will probably alter vertical flux of these elements to the deep ocean.

In order to allow full comparability with other ocean acidification data sets, the R package seacarb (Gattuso et al, 2019) was used to compute a complete and consistent set of carbonate system variables, as described by Nisumaa et al. (2010). In this dataset the original values were archived in addition with the recalculated parameters (see related PI). The date of carbonate chemistry calculation by seacarb is 2020-03-18.

Identifier
DOI https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.914329
Related Identifier https://doi.org/10.1038/s41558-019-0557-y
Related Identifier https://doi.org/10.26179/5c3e745a9b071
Related Identifier https://CRAN.R-project.org/package=seacarb
Metadata Access https://ws.pangaea.de/oai/provider?verb=GetRecord&metadataPrefix=datacite4&identifier=oai:pangaea.de:doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.914329
Provenance
Creator Petrou, Katherina; Baker, Kirralee G; Nielsen, Daniel A; Hancock, Alyce M; Schulz, Kai Georg; Davidson, Andrew T
Publisher PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
Contributor Yang, Yan
Publication Year 2019
Rights Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
OpenAccess true
Representation
Language English
Resource Type Dataset
Format text/tab-separated-values
Size 104844 data points
Discipline Earth System Research
Spatial Coverage (77.967 LON, -68.583 LAT)