Flowering phenology observations from 23 Arctic and alpine sites from 1992 through 2015

Advancing phenology is one of the most visible effects of climate change on plant communities, and has been especially pronounced in temperature-limited tundra ecosystems. However, phenological responses have been shown to differ greatly between species, with some species shifting phenology more than others. We analyzed a database of 42,689 tundra plant phenological observations to show that warmer temperatures are leading to a contraction of community-level flowering seasons in tundra ecosystems due to a greater advancement in flowering times of late-flowering species than of early-flowering species. Shorter flowering seasons with a changing climate have the potential to alter trophic interactions in tundra ecosystems. Interestingly, these findings differ from those of warmer ecosystems, where early flowering species have been found to be more sensitive to temperature change, suggesting that community-level phenological responses to warming can vary greatly between biomes.

Identifier
Source https://www.polardata.ca/pdcsearch/PDCSearchDOI.jsp?doi_id=12961
Metadata Access http://www.polardata.ca/oai/provider?verb=GetRecord&metadataPrefix=fgdc&identifier=12961_fgdc
Provenance
Creator Prevey, Janet
Publisher Canadian Cryospheric Information Network
Contributor Polar Data Catalogue
Publication Year 2018
Rights Research programs, CCIN, or ArcticNet take no liability for the use or transmission of this data
OpenAccess true
Contact janet.prevey(at)gmail.com; pdc(at)uwaterloo.ca
Representation
Language English
Format Computer file
Discipline Environmental Research
Spatial Coverage (-157.000W, -36.000S, 147.000E, 81.000N)
Temporal Coverage Begin 1992-03-30T00:00:00Z
Temporal Coverage End 2015-10-01T00:00:00Z