The Political and Economic Geography of Southern Secession

DOI

We study the economic and political determinants of the Southern secession movement of 1860/61. While economic historians emphasize the importance of slavery to the South’s economy as the primary factor behind the movement, we demonstrate the important role that political inequality among whites played in facilitating secession. In particular, secession was decided in state conventions, which allowed secessionists to exploit biases to representation and may have been pivotal in Alabama and Georgia. Our results suggest that the region’s investment in slavery alone may not be sufficient to explain the electoral success of the movement in the biggest Lower South states.

Identifier
DOI https://doi.org/10.3886/E114887V1
Metadata Access https://www.da-ra.de/oaip/oai?verb=GetRecord&metadataPrefix=oai_dc&identifier=oai:oai.da-ra.de:712114
Provenance
Creator Chacon, Mario; Jensen, Jeffrey
Publisher ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research
Publication Year 2019
Rights Download
OpenAccess true
Contact ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research
Representation
Resource Type Dataset
Discipline Social Sciences