Seawater carbonate chemistry and primary and bacterial production in Antarctic coastal waters during austral summer, supplement to: Westwood, Karen; Thomson, Paul G; van den Enden, Rick; Maher, L E; Wright, S; Davidson, Andrew T (2018): Ocean acidification impacts primary and bacterial production in Antarctic coastal waters during austral summer. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, 498, 46-60

DOI

Polar waters may be highly impacted by ocean acidification (OA) due to increased solubility of CO2 at colder water temperatures. Three experiments examining the influence of OA on primary and bacterial production were conducted during austral summer at Davis Station, East Antarctica (68°35′ S, 77°58′ E). For each experiment, six minicosm tanks (650 L) were filled with 200 μm filtered coastal seawater containing natural communities of Antarctic marine microbes. Assemblages were incubated for 10 to 12 days at CO2 concentrations ranging from pre-industrial to post-2300. Primary and bacterial production rates were determined using NaH14CO3 and 14C-leucine, respectively. Net community production (NCP) was also determined using dissolved oxygen. In all experiments, maximum photosynthetic rates (Pmax, mg C mg/chl a/h) decreased with elevated CO2, clearly reducing rates of total gross primary production (mg C/L/h). Rates of cell-specific bacterial productivity (μg C/cell/h) also decreased under elevated CO2, yet total bacterial production (μg C/L/h) and cell abundances increased with CO2 over Days 0–4. Initial increases in bacterial production and abundance were associated with fewer heterotrophic nanoflagellates and therefore less grazing pressure. The main changes in primary and bacterial productivity generally occurred at CO2 concentrations > 2 × present day (> 780 ppm), with the same responses occurring regardless of seasonally changing environmental conditions and microbial assemblages. However, NCP varied both within and among experiments, largely due to changing nitrate + nitrite (NOx) availability. At NOx concentrations < 1.5 μM photosynthesis to respiration ratios showed that populations switched from net autotrophy to heterotrophy and CO2 responses were suppressed. Overall, OA may reduce production in Antarctic coastal waters, thereby reducing food availability to higher trophic levels and reducing draw-down of atmospheric CO2, thus forming a positive feedback to climate change. NOX limitation may suppress this OA response but cause a similar decline.

In order to allow full comparability with other ocean acidification data sets, the R package seacarb (Gattuso et al, 2016) was used to compute a complete and consistent set of carbonate system variables, as described by Nisumaa et al. (2010). In this dataset the original values were archived in addition with the recalculated parameters (see related PI). The date of carbonate chemistry calculation by seacarb is 2019-05-17.

Identifier
DOI https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.902309
Related Identifier https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jembe.2017.11.003
Related Identifier https://CRAN.R-project.org/package=seacarb
Metadata Access https://ws.pangaea.de/oai/provider?verb=GetRecord&metadataPrefix=datacite4&identifier=oai:pangaea.de:doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.902309
Provenance
Creator Westwood, Karen; Thomson, Paul G; van den Enden, Rick; Maher, L E; Wright, S; Davidson, Andrew T
Publisher PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
Contributor Yang, Yan
Publication Year 2018
Rights Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International; https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
OpenAccess true
Representation
Language English
Resource Type Supplementary Dataset; Dataset
Format text/tab-separated-values
Size 5854 data points
Discipline Earth System Research
Spatial Coverage (77.967 LON, -68.583 LAT)