Post Coital DNA Recovery in Minority Proxy Couples, United States, 2014-2018 Archival Version

DOI

Introduction and Background. Minorities are less likely to report rapes. The Post Coital DNA Recovery (PCDR) study (2009-14) subjects were white (93%) where expanded collection times were not generalizable to minority populations. Evidence reports health and medical differences between races necessitating duplication of previous research in minority populations. Aims. (1) What is the time period in which it is possible to collect post-coital DNA in minority women using Y-STR laboratory methods? and (2) when compared to the former study sample of minority and non-minority, what are the physiological conditions, factors, or activities in minority couples that influence post-coital DNA recovery? Design. The design includes mixed methods duplication perfected in the first study, embracing descriptive and inferential techniques. Qualitative research used semi-structured interviews. Aim 1 analysis used PCDR-M data only. Aim 2 combined data from both PCDR and PCDR-M studies. Combined, DNA recovery, a binary outcome accounting for repeated methods in population regression analysis, used Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) methods. Fidelity. The strict criteria for adherence included considerable outreach and support of study personnel. PCDR and PCDR-M data combined and compared the two samples, which had specific homogeneity, including same inclusion and elimination criteria in both studies; fidelity to the validated protocol; laboratory method and interpretation for inclusion; duplicate statistical analysis; and interpretation of data. Any variation in key variables met elimination criteria. Assumptions and Limitations. Assumptions included (1) motivation is altruistic; (2) motivation is incentives and coercion for some; (3) negotiating coitus is difficult and stressful; and (4) similar fidelity and dropout rates. The limitations included (1) a lack of representation for the diverse experiences of rape victims; (2) sample size; (3) self-selection bias; (4) protocol adherence; and (4) advances in laboratory science and DNA kits. Demographics. Demographic variables included gender, race, and age. Major categories in the dataset included participants' reproductive history, data on female participants' reproductive organs, and childhood abuse.

Aims. (1) What is the time period in which it is possible to collect post-coital DNA in minority women using Y-STR laboratory methods? and (2) when compared to the former study sample of minority and non-minority, what are the physiological conditions, factors, or activities in minority couples that influence post-coital DNA recovery.

The design includes mixed methods duplication perfected in the first study, embracing descriptive and inferential techniques. Qualitative research used semi-structured interviews. Aim 1 analysis used PCDR-M data only. Aim 2 combined data from both PCDR and PCDR-M studies. Combined, DNA recovery, a binary outcome accounting for repeated methods in population regression analysis, used Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) methods.

The dataset ACE contains variables related to childhood abuse. The datasets Allele2018 and DNA_C contain variables related to cervix and fornix analysis. The datasets Demo_combined and Phi contain demographic variables. The datasets F_Reproductive_History and M_Reproductive_History contain variables related to the sexual health history and reproductive history of participants. The dataset HERS contains variables related to the Hymen Estrogen Response Scale (HERS).

ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection: Created variable labels and/or value labels..

Datasets:DS0: Study-Level FilesDS1: ACE Public-Use DataDS2: ACE Restricted-Use DataDS3: Allele2018 Public-Use DataDS4: Allele2018 Restricted-Use DataDS5: Demo_combined Public-Use DataDS6: Demo_combined Restricted-Use DataDS7: DNA_C Public-Use DataDS8: DNA_C Restricted-Use DataDS9: F_Reproductive_History Public-Use DataDS10: F_Reproductive_History Restricted-Use DataDS11: HERS Dataset Public-Use DataDS12: HERS Restricted-Use DataDS13: M_Reproductive_History Public-Use DataDS14: M_Reproductive_History Restricted-Use DataDS15: Phi Public-Use DataDS16: Phi Restricted-Use Data

Monogamous couples in the United States. Smallest Geographic Unit: Zip Code

A local recruitment of minority proxy couples occurred through organizational networks and media. Volunteer proxy couples called the study phone to express interest, and the caller was screened for eligibility. Recruitment and screening questions eliminated those with full hysterectomy (must have a cervix), male vasectomy or infertility (must have sperm DNA) and obesity (which lowers sperm count). If not self-eliminated, interested couples and collectors contacted the Principle Investigator (PI) or co-investigator where a telephone discussion about the study and protocol for IRB approved informed consent occurred. Participants received consent paperwork through the U S Post Office or email following the screening, determination of eligibility, and telephone-consent to receive the materials according to their preference, which included IRB-approved consent forms with tagged signature and initials locations for individual male and female participants. Once the PI received the signed consents from both couple-members, each participant completed the questionnaire and demographic survey. The PI determined eligibility and if eligible, provided study paperwork and supplies, which included the protocol, a diary card, pH strips, cotton-tipped applicators, and collector forms, and study directions to the female participant in the couple.

Funding institution(s): United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (2014-NE-BX-0009).

coded on-site observation

face-to-face interview

mail questionnaire

self-enumerated questionnaire

Identifier
DOI https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR37250
Metadata Access https://www.da-ra.de/oaip/oai?verb=GetRecord&metadataPrefix=oai_dc&identifier=oai:oai.da-ra.de:735236
Provenance
Creator Speck, Patricia M.
Publisher Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research
Contributor United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice
Publication Year 2019
Rights Delivery; One or more files in this study are not available for download due to special restrictions; consult the study documentation to learn more on how to obtain the data.
OpenAccess true
Contact Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research
Representation
Language English
Resource Type Dataset; clinical data, observational data
Discipline History