Effects of elevated CO2 on early life history development of the yellowtail kingfish, Seriola lalandi, a large pelagic fish, supplement to: Munday, Philip L; Watson, Sue-Ann; Parsons, Darren M; King, Alicia; Barr, Neill G; Mcleod, Ian M; Allan, Bridie J M; Pether, Steve M J (2016): Effects of elevated CO2 on early life history development of the yellowtail kingfish, Seriola lalandi, a large pelagic fish. ICES Journal of Marine Science, 73(3), 641-649

DOI

An increasing number of studies have examined the effects of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) and ocean acidification on marine fish, yet little is known about the effects on large pelagic fish. We tested the effects of elevated CO2 on the early life history development and behaviour of yellowtail kingfish, Seriola lalandi. Eggs and larvae were reared in current day control (450 µatm) and two elevated CO2 treatments for a total of 6 d, from 12 h post-fertilization until 3 d post-hatching (dph). Elevated CO2 treatments matched projections for the open ocean by the year 2100 under RCP 8.5 (880 µatm CO2) and a higher level (1700 µatm CO2) relevant to upwelling zones where pelagic fish often spawn. There was no effect of elevated CO2 on survival to hatching or 3 dph. Oil globule diameter decreased with an increasing CO2 level, indicating potential effects of elevated CO2 on energy utilization of newly hatched larvae, but other morphometric traits did not differ among treatments. Contrary to expectations, there were no effects of elevated CO2 on larval behaviour. Activity level, startle response, and phototaxis did not differ among treatments. Our results contrast with findings for reef fish, where a wide range of sensory and behavioural effects have been reported. We hypothesize that the absence of behavioural effects in 3 dph yellowtail kingfish is due to the early developmental state of newly hatched pelagic fish. Behavioural effects of high CO2 may not occur until larvae commence branchial acid-base regulation when the gills develop; however, further studies are required to test this hypothesis. Our results suggest that the early stages of kingfish development are tolerant to rising CO2 levels in the ocean.

In order to allow full comparability with other ocean acidification data sets, the R package seacarb (Gattuso et al, 2015) was used to compute a complete and consistent set of carbonate system variables, as described by Nisumaa et al. (2010). In this dataset the original values were archived in addition with the recalculated parameters (see related PI). The date of carbonate chemistry calculation is 2016-05-24.

Identifier
DOI https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.860712
Related Identifier https://doi.org/10.1093/icesjms/fsv210
Related Identifier https://cran.r-project.org/package=seacarb
Metadata Access https://ws.pangaea.de/oai/provider?verb=GetRecord&metadataPrefix=datacite4&identifier=oai:pangaea.de:doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.860712
Provenance
Creator Munday, Philip L; Watson, Sue-Ann; Parsons, Darren M; King, Alicia; Barr, Neill G; Mcleod, Ian M; Allan, Bridie J M; Pether, Steve M J
Publisher PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
Contributor Yang, Yan
Publication Year 2016
Rights Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported; https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
OpenAccess true
Representation
Language English
Resource Type Supplementary Dataset; Dataset
Format text/tab-separated-values
Size 591 data points
Discipline Earth System Research