Seawater carbonate chemistry and swimming activity, oxygen uptake,growth and otolith structure of Acanthochromis polyacanthus

DOI

Increased levels of dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) drive ocean acidification and have been predicted to increase the energy use of marine fishes via physiological and behavioural mechanisms. This notion is based on a theoretical framework suggesting that detrimental effects on energy use are caused by plasma acid–base disruption in response to hypercapnic acidosis, potentially in combination with a malfunction of the gamma aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors in the brain. However, the existing empirical evidence testing these effects primarily stems from studies that exposed fish to elevated CO2 for a few days and measured a small number of traits. We investigated a range of energetic traits in juvenile spiny chromis damselfish (Acanthochromis polyacanthus) over 3 months of acclimation to projected end-of-century CO2 levels (~ 1000 µatm). Somatic growth and otolith size and shape were unaffected by the CO2 treatment across 3 months of development in comparison with control fish (~ 420 µatm). Swimming activity during behavioural assays was initially higher in the elevated CO2 group, but this effect dissipated within ~ 25 min following handling. The transient higher activity of fish under elevated CO2 was not associated with a detectable difference in the rate of oxygen uptake nor was it mediated by GABAA neurotransmitter interference because treatment with a GABAA antagonist (gabazine) did not abolish the CO2 treatment effect. These findings contrast with several short-term studies by suggesting that end-of-century levels of CO2 may have negligible direct effects on the energetics of at least some species of fish.

In order to allow full comparability with other ocean acidification data sets, the R package seacarb (Gattuso et al, 2019) was used to compute a complete and consistent set of carbonate system variables, as described by Nisumaa et al. (2010). In this dataset the original values were archived in addition with the recalculated parameters (see related PI). The date of carbonate chemistry calculation by seacarb is 2020-03-06.

Identifier
DOI https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.913179
Related Identifier https://doi.org/10.1007/s00442-019-04430-z
Related Identifier https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.7965005
Related Identifier https://CRAN.R-project.org/package=seacarb
Metadata Access https://ws.pangaea.de/oai/provider?verb=GetRecord&metadataPrefix=datacite4&identifier=oai:pangaea.de:doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.913179
Provenance
Creator Sundin, Josefin; Amcoff, Mirjam; Mateos-González, Fernando; Raby, Graham D; Clark, Timothy D
Publisher PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
Contributor Yang, Yan
Publication Year 2019
Rights Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
OpenAccess true
Representation
Language English
Resource Type Dataset
Format text/tab-separated-values
Size 338837 data points
Discipline Earth System Research
Spatial Coverage (147.643 LON, -18.824 LAT)